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Bréviandes

This commune covers an area of 6.1km² and has nearly 2540 inhabitants who are known as ‘Bréviandois’. It is located in the suburbs south of Troyes, about 5km from the city centre. Reached from Troyes via the Boulevard de Dijon or the western ring road, it is located just over 5 minutes from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

It has a nursery school, a primary school, a library, various social and cultural facilities, and many voluntary organisations which all make Bréviandes an independent and lively place. Bréviandes town centre has public transport links with the rest of the Troyes conurbation and a range of shops, health services, banks and leisure facilities to meet a variety of everyday needs. The hamlet of Villepart is next to Bréviandes and provides the commune with a natural environment perfect for strolls along the Seine and its tributaries. The banks of the Seine were formerly used for bathing and are still very much appreciated by residents. For several centuries Bréviandes was the site of a lepers’ hospital, ‘La Léproserie des Deux Eaux’ due to the presence of plenty of water.  There is still a debate as to exactly where it was located.

Set back from the main road, Avenue M. Leclerc, the church of Saint-Vincent-de-Paul is a good example of religious architecture from the second half of the 19th century. The use of brick and the lack of transepts are typical of churches of this period. The varying heights of the roof that can been seen from the entrance recall the height of 16th-century gothic churches. Most of the stained-glass windows were made by Vincent Feste, a master glassmaker from Troyes who undertook the restoration of many 16th-century windows. With vibrant colours and detailed decoration, the windows of Saint-Vincent-de-Paul are beautifully made. Cécile Boël, a master glassmaker from Aube added a modern stained-glass window to Bréviandes church in November 2012.

In Rue de l’Egalité, the First World War memorial has the bust of a helmeted soldier in front of the flag, standing on a square column.

Commune Website 

Rosières-près-Troyes

This commune covers an area of 6.2km² and has 3750 inhabitants who are known as ‘Caillotins’. It is located in the suburbs south-west of Troyes, 5km from the city centre. It is close to the ring road and is 8 minutes from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

Rosières stands out for the range of cultural and sporting activities available, and for the number of schools in the commune, considering its size. Pupils can be educated in Rosières from nursery school right up to university level without leaving the commune. The commune is as popular for its shops as it is for its rural feel, which it has managed to retain. It has been awarded two flowers by the Villes et Villages Fleuris organisation.

Since 1937, Rosières youth hostel has provided visitors with a convenient place to stay, whether in the modern buildings or in the former priory of Saint Scholastica, which dates from 1626.

For as long as anyone can remember, Rosières-près-Troyes has been associated with its château. The precise dates of the foundations of the château and village are unknown, but according to Courtalon, who wrote a topographical history of the area, the village may have grown up around the estate in 1520. According to other sources, it must have existed earlier because Pierre de Provins mentioned the village in 1520. The origin of the name Rosières has nothing to do with the roses of the Château gardens, but rather refers to a marshy area with ‘roseaux’ or reeds. The château has been in private hands since it was sold at the Revolution. Although there has been a château on the site since at least the 13th century, the present building dates from the 16th and17th centuries and the first quarter of the 18th century, and can be seen with its moated entrance in Avenue Ingres. It has been classified as an historic monument since 1926.

The commune of Rosières is bordered by the woods that run alongside the Triffoire. On the banks of this stream, the wash house can still be seen and witnesses to the daily life of the inhabitants of Rosières from the second half of the 19th century to the mid-20th century. A few metres from the Mairie, Rosières-près-Troyes pays homage to villagers killed in battle with a monument built in 1995.

Commune Website

Barberey-Saint-Sulpice

This commune covers an area of 9.3km² and has around 1325 inhabitants who are known as ‘Barberotins’. It is located 5 minutes north-west of Troyes. The Troyes ring road goes through Barberey-Saint-Sulpice as well as the D21, the D91 and the D690, which goes through Ile-de-France. Troyes-Barberey airport is less than 5 minutes from the middle of the commune and offers leisure flights. It is also around 10 minutes from junction 20 (Torvilliers) of the A5 from Paris and 13 minutes from junction 22 (Charmont-sous-Barbuise) of the A26 between Calais and Troyes.

Barberey-Saint-Sulpice has a nursery and primary school. The stadium where the commune's football club trains is a few metres away. Barberey-Saint-Sulpice’s shopping centre is an attractive asset for the town. From the road to Sainte-Maure it is possible to join the cycle track where cyclists, roller skaters and walkers can enjoy a ride or stroll in the countryside a few kilometres from Troyes. The greenway leads to an historic monument that was classified in 1980 and is evidence of the springing up of metal constructions during the 19th century. Restored in 2014, the iron canal aqueduct was constructed between 1847 and 1849 by the engineer Pierre-Olivier Lebasteur.

Since 1965, the Château of Barberey-Saint-Sulpice has also used nature to its advantage by developing its gardens and is now designated as a ‘Jardin Remarquable’. The current owners have completely renovated the château and its gardens. The building is in the Louis XIII style with alternating brick and stonework and was built in 1626 for Jean le Mairat, lord of the manor of Barberey, which he inherited from his grandfather Louis le Mairat, mayor of Troyes during the 1580s. The château has been listed in the supplementary inventory of historic monuments since 1930 and its façade and roof have been classified as historic monuments since 1980.

The commune of Barberey gets its suffix from the church of Saint-Sulpice.  It dates from the 16th century, apart from its nave, which is Romanesque (10th-12th century). It has been listed as an historic monument since 1925. Saint-Sulpice is most remarkable for its renaissance gallery decorated with carved wooden scrolls and fantastic figures within medallions, interspersed with fluted columns. It is classified as an historic monument along with other furnishings such as a painted and gilded oak cupboard dating from the end of the 18th century, a carved, painted and gilded oak reliquary bust of Saint-Sulpice from the 17th century, the memorial stone of Claude Louis Bruslé, Prefect of Aube who died in 1825 and a polychrome limestone statue of Saint Sebastian from the 16th century.

Next to the Mairie there is an obelisk on a pedestal supporting the carved bust of a soldier that stands as a memorial to those killed in the First World War. Plaques on the sides remember those who died in the 1870-71 war, the Indochina war and the Second World War.

Saint-Germain

This commune covers an area of 13.8km² and has 2284 inhabitants who are known as ‘Germinois’. It is made up of the main village and 3 hamlets: Lépine, Chevillèle and Linçon. Saint-Germain is located south-west of Troyes and the N77 to Auxerre passes through it. It is about 10 min from junction 20 (Torvilliers) of the A5 between Paris and Troyes.

Saint-Germain offers a way of life that balances the convenience of the town with the charm of the countryside. It has a thriving community with associations, shops, and facilities for sports and culture, such as the multimedia library and the ‘La comédie Saint-Germain’ theatre. Everything is located in a pleasant, green environment which has been awarded three flowers by the Villes et Villages Fleuris organisation.

The 16th-century church, which is dedicated to Saint-Germain d’Auxerre, is located in the middle of the village. It has suffered the ravages of time and the western half of the church collapsed in 1936-37, which has left it with a most unusual façade. Only the choir, formed of an apse and two bays, survives, but its 16th-century stained-glass windows, which were classified as historic monuments in 1894, are still remarkable for the quality of the detailing and their overall design. Whilst Linçon has lost its church, the church in Lépine survives. It still stands in Rue de l’Eglise, off the main road. The building dates from the 12th and 16th centuries and was heavily restored in the 19th century. It is dedicated to Saint-Barthélémy and its 16th-century stained-glass windows were classified as historic monuments in 1913.

Saint-Germain and Lépine each have a war memorial where respects are paid to the combatants of the two world wars on the various days of remembrance.

Commune Website  

Creney-près-Troyes

This commune covers an area of 15.7km² and has around 1740 inhabitants who are known as ‘Coeurlequins’. It is located 6km east of Troyes. The Troyes ring road goes through Creney-près-Troyes as well as the D5, the D172 and the D960 to Brienne-le-Château. Junction 23 (Thennelières) of the A26 between Calais and Troyes is about 5 minutes from Creney-près-Troyes.

It has a nursery school and a primary school, a multimedia library and has been awarded two flowers by the Villes et Villages Fleuris organisation. With many cultural, leisure and sporting associations, Creney-près-Troyes is a lively place to live and one that respects the environment.

Its church of Saint-Aventin mostly dates from the 16th century. It was classified as an historic monument in 1907. Its 16th-century stained-glass windows were classified in 1894 and are of high quality design. They also have fine detailing inspired by the windows of the church of La Madeleine in Troyes. Some of the church furnishings are classified as historic monuments, including a 19th-century gilded oak reliquary of Saint Aventin, two painted and gilded tomb-shaped reliquaries dating from the 18th century, and a 19th-century painted and gilded carved oak eagle lectern.

Next to the church an obelisk pays homage to those who died in the 1870 war, the Algerian war and the First and Second World Wars. Creney-près-Troyes suffered greatly in the Second World War, and in 1946 erected a striking war memorial in the west of the commune on the Allée des Martyrs. A pedestal supports a sculpture of a member of the resistance who has been shot. A bronze plaque is set into the stone, and is engraved with the names of the four who were shot on 22 February 1944 and the 49 executed on 22 August 1944. In 1994, a memorial stone was placed at the fatal site and 53 trees were planted in memory of these martyrs.

Commune Website

Buchères

This commune covers an area of 7.1km² and has around 1490 inhabitants who are known as ‘Buchérois’. It is located 8km south of Troyes city centre and has been part of the greater Troyes area since 2011. It can be reached via various routes, including the D444 from Troyes and Bréviandes and the D671 ‘Route de Dijon’. Buchères is less than 5 minutes from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

Buchères retains all the characteristics of a rural commune, but with economic development centred around businesses, shops and associations, as well as the facilities and services available to residents, it is becoming increasingly suburban.  Rural charm is mixed with the convenience of the town. Two flowers have been awarded by the Villes et Villages Fleuris organisation in recognition of the community's green fingers.

History has left its mark on Buchères from the time it was first occupied in the Middle Paleolithic, as can be seen by the everyday objects that were found during excavations. Wars have also touched Buchères. During the Napoleonic campaigns of 1814, the area was occupied by encampments of soldiers on route to confront the Prussian army a few kilometres away between Clérey, Isle-Aumont and Buchères. Napoleon himself may have set a trap at Maisons Blanches causing 20,000 enemy cavalrymen to stampede across the hamlet.

In Rue du Monument to the east of the village, the First World War memorial pays homage to the ‘children of Buchères who died for France’. In Rue des Martyrs du 24 Août a lantern of the dead has been erected in memory of the 67 civilians who were massacred in Buchères on the 24 August 1944.

The church is dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin and dates from 1850 - 1853. The neo-classical style of Buchères church is evident from its façade, which is decorated with a tympanum. The porch also takes inspiration from antiquity with its entablature and pilasters with Corinthian capitals.

Commune Website 

Saint-Léger-près-Troyes

This commune covers an area of 9.2km² and has nearly 785 inhabitants who are known as ‘Taupins’ due to the large number of earthworms in Saint-Léger! The village is located in the suburbs of Troyes and is adjacent to Buchères, Bréviandes, Rosières and Saint-Germain. It is 8km south of the city centre. Saint-Léger is 5km from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

With 679 hectares of farmland and 108 hectares of woods, the commune retains a rural feel. About fifteen sports, social and cultural associations provide a variety of leisure pursuits and organise occasional events. The verdant natural environment of Saint-Léger is due to two tributaries of the Seine that pass through the commune, the Hurande and the Triffoire.

In Rue de la Joncière, the Ferme Musée Rustique is a living-history museum that invites you into the world of the past thanks to its completely restored timber-framed buildings, agricultural implements and collection of objects that bring the rural life of yesteryear alive today. There are tours and lectures, and visits end with the owner reading poetry as you gather around the log fire.

The village has in the past been known by several other names: Montreuil, St-Léger sous Cervet, St-Léger sous Bréviandes, and finally Saint-Léger-près-Troyes. The church dates from the 16th century and is dedicated to Saint-Léger. It has been classified as an historic monument since 1980. The church is typical of the region and has a nave and aisles of the same size and height. This design is known as a ‘hall church’ and there are about twenty churches of this type in Aube.  

Commune Website

Rouilly-saint-Loup

This commune covers an area of 11km² and has about 560 inhabitants who are known as ‘Lupirulliens’. The inhabitants of Rouilly-saint-Loup chose this name as recently as 2002. It comes from lupus - wolf in Latin - and rullius, which is a tool used to clean ploughs. Located 9km south-east of Troyes, it is reached via the D161 or the D161. It is 6km from junction 23 (Thennelières) of the A26 between Calais and Troyes and 10 min from junction 21 of the A5 from Paris. The cycle track between Troyes and Dienville is also a good way for cyclists, roller skaters and pedestrians to reach Rouilly-Saint-Loup.

Rouilly-Saint-Loup primary school is part of an inter-communal group of schools along with those in Montaulin and Ruvigny. The commune of Rouilly-Saint-Loup offers residents and visitors a variety of activities including walks, hunting, fishing and a discovery trail (devised in 2013 by the oldest pupils in Rouilly primary school).

The green spaces, such as the Parc de Menois, the cycle track and the canal, as well as the proximity of the Grands Lacs, make Rouilly-Saint-Loup a peaceful place to live. The old timber-framed houses and farm buildings that have been privately renovated all serve to enhance the commune and give it character. The history of the commune is visible as you wander through its streets. In Rue de la Gare, the old railway station - which has been converted into a house - still recalls the industrial heritage of the commune.

In Rue Saint-Loup the church of Saint-Donat - which has Romanesque origins but was altered in the 16th century - has numerous representations of Bishop Lupus. He saved Troyes from Attila the Hun in 451 and gave his name - Saint Loup - to the village.  The 16th-century windows depict scenes of the crucifixion and the life of John the Baptist, St Sebastian, St John, St Madeleine, St Loup, St Nicholas and the Virgin Mary and are classified as historic monuments. Other items of church furniture are also classified as historic monuments, including numerous 16th-century limestone statuettes depicting various saints, including  St Marguerite, St Catherine, St Donat and St Loup.

Commune Website

Sainte-Maure

This commune covers an area of 21km² and has 1465 inhabitants who are known as ‘Mauraciens’. It is located 7km north of Troyes. Reached via the D78, D91 or the D677 is about 10 minutes from junction 23 (Thennelières) of the A26 between Calais and Troyes.

Sainte-Maure has several associations, including a handball club. The commune has a nursery school and a primary school. This green village is surrounded by fields and meadows. Sainte-Maure also has a remarkable history and heritage.

The village owes its name to St Maure, a young Christian girl who devoted her life to her religion and who died and was buried in the village in 850. The church, which is dedicated to this young saint, dates partly from the 15th century (the nave and side aisles), and partly from the 16th century (the sanctuary). It has been listed as an historic monument since 1931. Since 2008, the stained-glass windows - which had been classified as historic monuments since 1894 - have been protected as an integral part of the church of Sainte-Maure.  The church retains a wealth of varied church furnishings including around thirty items that are classified as historic monuments. A great many of these objects are dedicated to St Maure, including her 9th-century limestone and copper sarcophagus, her 18th-century painted and gilded oak reliquary statue, a painted and gilded oak reliquary bust from the 17th century and a polychrome limestone statue from the 15th century.

On the road to Saint-Benoit-sur-Seine you can see the Château de Vermoise. Dating from the 1st quarter of the 16th century and classified as an historic monument in 1977 for its façade and the roofs of its keep, it remains a private property. It offers bed and breakfast accommodation and a reception venue.

Villechétif

This commune covers an area of 12.2km² and has 946 inhabitants who are known as ‘Acoutins’. It is located 9.5km east of Troyes. Reached via the D86, D147, D172, D186 or the D690, Villechétif is less than 5km from junction 23 (Thennelières) of the A26 between Calais and Troyes.

In a green and rural setting, Villechétif has various amenities and associations. The commune has a nursery and primary school, and a retail park that extends that of Saint-Parres-aux-Tertres which is very close by. A village or semi-urban commune, Villechétif is very much focused on the future. 

A few metres from the Mairie, the spire of the church of the Nativité de la Vierge, which dates from 1865, attracts the attention. In what is known as the neo-Gothic style, its extravagant height characterises the resurgence of Gothic art that was fashionable in the 19th  century and which led to an architectural boom. Its façade is decorated with lancets, roofs, projections and reinforcements of the general structure.

In front of the church, Villechétif has created a memorial garden around the war memorial, which is surrounded by railings. In the middle, a woman draped in the flag stands in front of a stone on which Villechétif pays homage to its ‘children who died for France’ during the First World War.

 

Torvilliers

This commune covers an area of 12km² and has 920 inhabitants who are known as ‘Torvillois’. It is adjacent to Rivière-de-Corps and Saint-Germain and is 9km from Troyes city centre. Reached via the D53 or the D141, it is next to junction 20 of the A5 from Paris.

In the last few years, Torvilliers has been transformed by road repairs, the creation of pavements and new buildings, including housing and public amenities such as a new school. It now has a more modern feel. The commune’s proximity to the city gives the impression that it is semi-rural, but Torvilliers retains its rural character and is surrounded by fields. There are beautiful timber-framed houses and barns, which the owners have succeeded in renovating whilst keeping their distinctive Champenois features. Torvilliers has considerably improved its environment and ensures that its planting schemes are sustainable. It has been encouraged by the award of two flowers by the Villes et Villages Fleuris organisation.

In February 1814, the commune was caught up in the conflict between Napoleon’s army and the Prussians, and became a battlefield. In the courtyard of the Mairie, an obelisk on a pedestal pays homage to those who died in the First World War, whilst in the cemetery, a memorial stone commemorates the victims of all wars.

In the east of Torvilliers, the church of Saint-Denis, which dates from the beginning of the 16th century, has been classified as an historic monument in its entirety since 1980, the choir and transept having already been classified in 1911. Its 16th-century stained-glass windows have been classified since 1903.