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Javernant

This commune covers an area of 5.6km² and has just over 160 inhabitants who are known as ‘Javernandats’. It is located 20km south-west of Troyes. Reached via the D34, D188 or the N77, it is 16km from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

On the doorstep of the Pays d’Othe, the village of Javernant is made up of wooded valleys and plains where the fields stretch as far as the horizon. This rural community enjoys a pleasant lifestyle.

The church of the Assomption de la Vierge dates from the beginning of the 16th century and can be found alongside the D34. Listed as an historic monument since 1926, its 16th-century stained-glass windows have been classified since 1913. Old glass has been reassembled in the windows to form composite panels. You can see, for example, a scene from Genesis inspired by the windows in the church of La Madeleine in Troyes. The Jesse Tree has taken its inspiration from the cartoons for those of the church at Noës.   In the façade of Javernant church, the flamboyant doorway (that is one with carved detailing that proliferates upwards and recalls the image of a flame) has two arches, in the column between which a statue of Christ at Calvary sits in a niche. The church houses furnishings as varied as they are of good quality, including an eagle lectern dating from the first quarter of the 19th century, a late 16th-century wooden statue of Saint-Vorles saving a child from the flames, and the tombstone of Jacques le Pitancier from the 15th century. These, amongst others, are classified as objects considered to be historic monuments.

Next to the church the war memorial pays homage to nine Javernandats who died for France during the First World War.

Commune Website

Assenay

This commune covers an area of 3.4km² and has nearly 160 inhabitants who are known as ‘Asnacussiens’. It is located 20km south of Troyes. Reached via the D25 or the D123, it is 10 km from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

The village of Assenay is spread out through the woods and fields, and has alternating views into the distance and of the surrounding small valleys. Its associations and a few businesses make it a lively place, and it is possible to stay here in charming B&Bs. Assenay has a mix of modern houses and typical rural cottages with half-timbering or exposed brickwork. Farmhouses and working farms are visible throughout Assenay's Champenois countryside.

Crésantignes

This commune covers an area of 2km² and has just over 310 inhabitants. It is located 20km south-west of Troyes. Reached via the D34 or the N77, it is 16km from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

Crésantignes is a green and rural village spread out along the banks of the Mogne. There are with farmhouses and more modern buildings dotted amongst the timber-framed houses and those with exposed brickwork. This all adds to the character of the village, which has a thriving community.

The Musée du Passé Simple, which is located in the middle of the village on the main street, displays historic tools and implements in its rooms to enable visitors to explore the customs and daily life of days gone by.  This museum aims to keep alive the memory of a past that is not so long ago, and it continues to receive new acquisitions. Two hundred metres away in Ruelle de l’Etang, the wash house - which was built in the 1850s - recalls the daily life of the inhabitants of Crésantignes. This was in line with the main principles of hygiene that began to appear during the second half of the 19th century.

Next to it stands the church of Saint-Sébastien, which dates from 1780 and is typical of 18th-century constructions with its nave and side aisles without transepts. It houses a wealth of church furnishings, including a polychrome limestone reredos that was rescued from the collegiate church of Lirey when it was destroyed in 1828. Classified as an historic monument in 1908, it depicts Christ's passion and dates from the 2nd half of the 16th century. Sculptures of saints - such as the 16th-century reliquary statuette of Saint-Fiacre, and the 18th-century lectern topped with an eagle, are also classified as objects considered to be historic monuments. A 16th-century statuette of the Madonna and Child in gilded white marble, which has been classified as an historic monument since 1913 and which is integrated into the 18th-century polychrome and gilded limestone altar in the Lady Chapel, was shown in the exhibition ‘Le Beau XVIe siècle: masterpieces of sculpture in Champagne.’

Next to the church, two black marble plaques commemorate the First and Second World Wars and pay homage to their victims.

Sommeval

This commune covers an area of 9.5km² and has 326 inhabitants who are known as ‘Sommevaliens’. It is located 20km south-west of Troyes. Reached via the D72 or the D89, it is 20km from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

Sommeval is close to the little valleys of the Pays d’Othe, and is largely made up of the woodland that surrounds the fields that spread out to the south of the village. It is part of a school group with the communes of Bouilly, Javernant et Souligny. Village life in Sommeval is organised by voluntary groups, especially the festivities committee. It has been awarded two flowers by the Villes et Villages Fleuris organisation. There are several hiking trails that can be joined in Sommeval, including the GR2 between Paris and Dijon and the Sentier du Loup which passes through the woods of the Pays d’Othe.

The church of Saint-Martin dates from 1834 and is in the middle of the village. The bell tower dates from the 17th century, but the distinctive feature of this church is its ceiling. The framework is visible, and massive oak beams form lines and crosses along the nave. Several statuettes that are kept in the church have been classified as historic monuments since the 1980s, including a polychrome oak statue of St Nicholas dating from the 16th or 17th century, an 18th-century wooden statue of St Eloi, a 19th-century oak Madonna and Child and a limestone statue of Sainte Marguerite.

In front of the cemetery, the war memorial - which consists of an obelisk on a plinth surrounded by shells and decorated with the victory palm - commemorates the victims of the First World War.

Montsuzain

This commune covers an area of 19.6km² and has about 400 inhabitants who are known as ‘Montsuzanois’. It is located about 20 km north of Troyes. Reached via the D8 or the D9, it is less than 10 minutes from junction 22 (Charmont-sous-Barbuise) of the A26 between Calais and Troyes.

Montsuzain is part of a school group with the communes of Voué and Aubeterre. Much of Montsuzain is covered in fields, but the village is built around a wood that has grown up alongside the Barbuise stream. Rural cottages with exposed brickwork and timber-framed farmhouses are characteristic of the rural landscape of Montsuzain.

The ‘association to save the heritage of Montsuzain church’ works to protect the building. The church of La Conversion-de-Saint-Paul is in the middle of the village, a few metres from the Mairie, and mostly dates from the 16th century. The four pillars of the transepts date from the 12th century and form a clear square that forms the shape of the bell tower. Two pentagonal chapels add to the beauty of this church. Its 16th-century stained-glass windows have been classified as historic monuments since 1913.

On the roadside next to the church, the war memorial pays homage to those who died in the First World War. It consists of a metal statue of an armed soldier standing on a pedestal. Next to the bridge over the Barbuise in Rue du Stade, there is a memorial stone and plaque commemorating the 75 soldiers who died in battle on 15 June 1940 protecting the inhabitants and refusing to surrender.

Machy

This commune covers an area of 2.7km² and has 125 inhabitants who are known as ‘Machytins’. It is located 22km south-west of Troyes. Reached via the D25, D188 or the N77, it is about 15km from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

An elongated village crossed by the Mogne, the landscape combines rolling fields and views of the woods. The rural houses are part of village life and contribute to Machy's rural charm.

At number 8 of the main street, the completely restored wash house commemorates the daily life of the Machytins from less than a century ago. A few metres away the church of the Nativité de la Vierge, built between 1876 and 1878, overlooks the main road. In the 19th-century, brickwork was used to add colour to brighten up buildings that generally only included one main section. Here the red brick mainly highlights the windows and buttresses.

In the middle of the village on the main road, there is a plaque on the Mairie commemorating victims of the First World War.

Montceaux-les-Vaudes

This commune covers an area of 10km² and has just over 260 inhabitants who are known as ‘Montcelliens’. It is located 21km south of Troyes. Reached via the D85, D185 or the D444, it is 11 minutes from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

A verdant woody village, Montceaux-les-Vaudes is on the doorstep of the Forêt d’Aumont and benefits from its rural setting and the ponds to the north of the village. The typical half-timbered and exposed brick houses of the Auboise countryside are dotted around the exceptional natural landscape of Montceaux-les-Vaudes.

On Rue de l’Eglise, along the D185, stands the church of Sainte-Syre. Of Romanesque origin, it was rebuilt in 1872 and is on the site of the old chapel of the castle of Montceaux-les-Vaudes. Now destroyed, it was replaced by a 19th-century château that now houses a special school. The church houses several 16th-century objects that are classified as historic monuments, including an oak eagle lectern, polychrome wood statues of St Eutrope and St Barbe and polychrome limestone statuettes of St Eloi and St Reine. Its beautifully made 16th-century stained-glass windows have been classified as historic monuments since 1908.

At the end of the village street, an obelisk with croix de guerre medal commemorates the victims of the First World War.

Fays-la-Chapelle

This commune covers an area of 50 hectares and has 137 inhabitants who are known as ‘Faitas’. It is located 22km south-west of Troyes. Reached via the D1 or the D34, it is 20 minutes from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

Fays-la-Chapelle is an elongated village and its verdant landscape is dotted with orchards, half-timbered houses and cottages with exposed brickwork. This all adds to the rural charm of the village, which is a thriving community. Fays-la-Chapelle has the typical features of the Auboise countryside. 

To the west of the village in Rue de la Fontaine, the brick wash house recalls daily life for the Faitas from not so long ago.  The wash house was used between 1850 and 1950 and was a meeting place where people could wash their clothes more conveniently. It was also built to meet a desire to improve hygiene.

The church of the Nativité de la Vierge, which was built in 1854, has a single nave in a rural style. Its half-timbered walls and brick façade with its pattern of diamonds make the church fit perfectly into the landscape of Fays-la-Chapelle. There are two painted limestone statuettes in the church that are classified as objects considered to be historic monuments: a 15th-century Madonna and Child and a 16th-century Pietà.

Les Maupas

This commune covers an area of 4.2km² and has nearly 115 inhabitants who are known as ‘Maupasiens’. It is located 22km south of Troyes. Reached via the D1, it is 15 minutes from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Troyes.

The village is stretched out along the Seronne on the edge of the woods of the Forêt d’Aumont. It benefits from its natural resources and beautiful woodland. Half-timbered or exposed brick cottages are dotted around the idyllic landscape of Maupas.

Along the D1, the wash house - which is in very good condition - contributes to the rural image of Maupas. It is a witness to the daily life of the Maupasiens who used it between 1850 and 1950, a period during which ideas of convenience and hygiene began to take root in the capital, but also in villages like Maupas. On the Mairie there is a plaque in memory of those who died in the First World War. 

Estissac

This commune covers an area of 26 km² and is home to just over 1900 inhabitants who are known as ‘Liébautins’. This name comes from the former name of ‘Saint-Liébault’ which was replaced by ‘Estissac’ in 1758. The name is retained by both the inhabitants and the church, which dates from the 13th century and was enlarged in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries. Estissac is located 22km west of Troyes to which it is directly linked by the D660. It is about 15 minutes from junction 19 (Vulaines) of the A5 from Paris.

The town has several shops and a primary school. The commune has been awarded one flower by the Villes et Villages Fleuris organisation for its verdant environment.

Water is at the heart of the town. Three water-courses pass through the valley, which led the first Liébautins to settle here at the dawn of the neolithic era. The Domaine du Moulin D’Eguebaude offers various activities. A former mill, it is now used as a fish farm and can be visited. The wash house is in the ‘cage ouverte’ style. It is closed on three sides and has 5 large arched openings, but one side is left open - probably to allow for ventilation. Its bricks - a high quality material - and its architectural refinement, are a testimony to the aesthetic and practical design of this public wash house. It stands next to the main street - the Rue de la République - which leads to the commune’s village hall and also the supermarket. The road also leads to Estissac’s War Memorial. Topped by a cast iron soldier, the monument commemorates the Liébautins who died in the wars of 1870-71, 1914-18 and 1939-45.

In the middle of the village, opposite the Mairie, the church of Saint-Liébault, which dates from the 18th century, recalls the greatest artists of the 18th-century who painted its neo-classical doorway. This slightly protrudes from the façade and is framed by pilasters with Corinthian capitals and an entablature with triangular tympanum. This all harks back to Graeco-Roman antiquity, which was rediscovered in the 18th century and integrated into architecture of the time, whether in religious or secular buildings, in Paris, or in a village in the Pays d’Othe. Estissac’s church contains nearly a dozen works that are classified as objects recognised as historic monuments.  Among these is a limestone high-relief sculpture dating from 1550-1560 entitled La Dormition de la Vierge, which focuses on the scene and the facial expressions of the characters - from the eternal slumber of the Virgin to the sorrow of the apostles, which is manifested in different ways. This work was shown at an exhibition in 2009 at the church of Saint-Jean-au-Marché in Troyes entitled ‘Le Beau XVIe: masterpieces of sculpture in Champagne’.

A few metres from the church, the 17th-century market hall is now used for a Sunday morning market. Built as a corn-exchange and covered market, the hall is made of wooden beams with a solid roof, and has been classified as an historic monument since 1990.

Website : les portes du Pays d'Othe

Jeugny

This commune covers nearly 16km² and has around 480 inhabitants who are known as ‘Juvéniens’. It is located 23km south-west of Troyes. Reached via the D1, D25 or the D34, it is 16km from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

Village life is thriving thanks to its events and sporting associations, such as Gym Volontaire, and activities for children and young people provided by the inter-communal school group. In green and peaceful surroundings, Jeugny is on the doorstep of the Forêt d’Aumont which is a great place to unwind all year round.

In Rue de la Gare a 25m tall brick chimney can still be seen behind the new houses. The factory - a sawmill - which was established between 1900 and 1910, closed its doors in 1996.

Next to the D1, the church of Saint-Barthélémy, built between 1846 and 1850 is oriented to the north. The 19th-century drew inspiration from the past other than from Romanesque and Gothic architecture, and it was Roman basilicas that attracted the architects of this church. The nave is flanked by side aisles, pierced with semi-circular arched windows that mirror those high up in the nave. The apse is semi-circular and there are no transepts.

A square column decorated with a palm branch and perched on a pedestal pays homage to those killed in the First World War.

Commune Website

Longeville-sur-Mogne

This commune covers an area of 4km² and has 125 inhabitants who are known as ‘Longevillois’. It is located 22km south-west of Troyes. Reached via the D88, it is less than 15km from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

An elongated village in the Auboise countryside, it is surrounded by fields and woods. The Mogne flows through the village and contributes to Longeville-sur-Mogne’s rural charm. Close to the Forêt d’Aumont, the village is made up of typical rural houses and is a great place to live.

Alongside the D188, the Rue de Chilozes, Longeville-sur-Mogne’s wash house is still in good condition. Made from wooden beams and bricks, this shelter enabled the Longevillois to wash their laundry in good conditions. Wash houses were built from the 1850s onwards and were used until the 1950s, so less than a century ago this was a daily meeting place for the Longevillois.

At the Mairie, there is a plaque in memory of those who died in the First World War. 

Montieramey

This commune covers an area of 6.7km² and has just under 430 inhabitants. It is located about 23km south-east of Troyes. Reached via the D619 or the D43, it is 12 min from junction 23 (Thennelières) of the A26 between Calais and Troyes.

Montiéramey has a primary school and is a commune of the Forêt d’Orient Regional Nature Park. It offers a remarkable environment to live in, where local heritage and nature are preserved and linked to regional development.  

In Rue de la Gare in the east of the commune the old railway station still stands as an example of the architecture of village stations.

In the middle of the village, Rue de l’Eglise leads to the church of Notre-Dame-de-l’Assomption. Its nave and aisles date from the Romanesque period (10th - 12th century), whilst the transepts and apse are 16th century. It has been listed as an historic monument since 1840. The furnishings of Montiéramey church include more than thirty objects classified as historic monuments. These include a 17th-century reredos with two angel sculptures in polychrome gilded oak, a 14th-century stoup, two embossed and gilded silver chalices dating from the 19th century, a painted oak reliquary of Saint-Victor with bronze fitments from the 15th and 17th centuries, a 19th-century ceramic Madonna and Child and a 17th century oil on canvas of the Assumption by Jean Nicot from the workshop of Nicolas Poussin. There are many other classified objects, notably limestone sculptures of saints like the polychrome L’éducation de la Vierge dating from 1520-1530. This has the theme of religious education for women, and the detailing and high-quality execution of the clothing show that aesthetics went hand-in-hand with moral concerns. It was exhibited at the exhibition ‘Le Beau XVIe siècle: masterpieces of sculpture in Champagne’ which was held in 2009 at the church of Saint-Jean-au-Marché in Troyes.

In front of the church, the war memorial commemorates those who died in the First World War. In Rue de l’Abbaye to the south of Montiéramey there is a Benedictine Abbey that was founded in 837 and has been listed as an historic monument since 2001. Rebuilt in the 17th and 18th centuries, the Abbot’s lodgings, a barn and the dovecote survive today.

Commune Website 

Montreuil-sur-Barse

This commune covers an area of 13km² and has around 315 inhabitants who are known as ‘Montreuillois’. It is located just under 25 minutes south-east of Troyes. Reached via the D106, D57 or the D143, it is 11 minutes from junction 23 (Thennelières) of the A26 between Calais and Troyes.

Montreuil-sur-Barse has a primary school. It is one of the communes of the Forêt d’Orient Regional Nature Park. Its historic heritage, natural environment and the commune's recent economic development make it a unique place to live. Its beautiful brick and timber-framed rural cottages add to the rustic feel of the Auboise countryside, with its abundant vegetation typical of the ‘champagne humide’ area.

In the middle of the village, Rue du 27 August 1944 leads to the church of Saint-Gilles. The square marked out by the base of the bell tower, the short nave and the low porch are elements of its Romanesque architecture (10th - 12th century) that have been preserved. The rest of the building was added in the 16th century without compromising the original structure. The preservation of parts of the building dating from different centuries led to it being listed as an historic monument in 2002. Some of the church furnishings are classified or listed as historic monuments, including a 17th-century oak eagle lectern, an 18th-century gilded oak monstrance stand, a polychrome limestone Christ in Chains from the 16th century, and several oil paintings on canvas dating from the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries including a Saint Nicolas by Viard.

In the same road, there is a memorial bearing the names of 15 people who were executed on 27 August 1944. A few metres away, an iron soldier stands on a plinth commemorating the victims of the 1870 Indochina War and the First and Second World Wars. 

Dierrey-Saint-Pierre

This commune covers an area of 21.6km² and has around 260 inhabitants who are known as ‘Dierrotins’. It is located 20km north-west of Troyes. Reached via the D31, D33 or the D160, it is 13 min from junction 20 (Torvilliers) of the A5 from Paris.

Dierrey-Saint-Pierre has a nursery and primary school. The countryside around Dierrey-Saint-Pierre offers a rural setting, which is enhanced by the many extant farmhouses and simple rural buildings with attractive exposed brickwork.

The church of Saint-Pierre-ès-Liens dates from the 16th century, but its nave and vaulted ceiling is later and dates from the 18th century. The church is located beside the D31, which is the main road through the village. The apse of the church was destroyed when the road was built.

A few metres from the church is a small garden surrounding the war memorial. An obelisk carved with a helmet and rifle surrounded by oak leaves pays tribute to those who died in the First World War. 

Mesnil-Saint-Père

This commune covers an area of 17.50km² and has around 450 inhabitants who are known as ‘Mesnillois’. It is located just over 25 minutes south-east of Troyes. Reached via the D43 or the D619, it is about 20 minutes from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris.

It has been awarded the Blue Flag for the exemplary quality of its environment. Its marina and hotels - which have direct access to the beaches of the Lac d’Orient - welcome tourists and offer various activities including water sports as well as basketball, handball and tennis. It has also been awarded three flowers by the Villes et Villages Fleuris organisation in recognition of the quality of life in Mesnil-Saint-Père.  In addition, since the complete change in environment created by the construction of the lake in 1966, many renovations have been undertaken, especially of the timber-framed houses. The Mairie is on the D43, and sets an example with its pink and grey façade that shows off the structure of the building. Footpaths and cycle tracks make it easy to get around the village and enjoy the exceptional countryside offered by this commune of the Forêt d’Orient Regional Nature Park

The church of Saint-André in Rue de la Mission, a few metres from the Mairie, is testimony to life in Mesnil-Saint-Père in the 12th century. Altered during the 17th and 18th centuries, it is now closed for safety reasons, but it is still possible to admire it from outside. It has been listed as an historic monument since 1982.

Near the church, an obelisk decorated with the Gallic cockerel and the Croix de Guerre medal commemorates the victims of the First World War. A second war memorial is located just outside the village in the Impasse des Martyrs, off the D43 towards Troyes. It commemorates the 28 August 1944 and the 24 Mesnilois executed as the village was liberated. A woman stands on the monument mourning these deaths. She represents the widow, the mother, and all the women who lost these men. The sculptor is unknown, but clearly knew how to express the emotion of this tragic event through the sober and severe treatment of her clothing and the softness of her contemplative pose. 

Commune Website

Fresnoy-le-Château

This commune covers an area of 11.50km² and has around 255 inhabitants who are known as ‘Fresnichons’. It is located 30 minutes south-east of Troyes. Reached via the D1 or the D21, Fresnoy-le-Château is 12 minutes from junction 21 (Saint-Thibault) of the A5 from Paris and 15 minutes from junction 23 (Thennelières) from the A26 between Calais and Troyes.

The green coppiced countryside of Fresnoy-le-Château has the rural features of the Champagne humide area. The fields around the village are quite level, giving views of the surrounding woods. Modern houses and old rural cottages sit side-by-side in the village. 

Fresnoy get its suffix of ‘le-Châteaux’ from the private Château du Plessis.  Built in the manner of an 18th-century summer residence, the alternating stone and brickwork add character to the façade, which has two slightly protruding wings on each side. Classified as an historic monument in 2001, its current form dates from the building work undertaken between 1833 and 1844 by Count and General Louis Sébastien Gundler, but there has been a ‘Château du Plessis’ on this site since the 14th century.

The church of the Assumption was built between 1868 and 1869 and has features of the Gothic revival. Its bell tower is particularly slender due to the architectural decoration that creates a tier decorated with columns.

In front of the church, an obelisk decorated with the victory palm and the Croix de Guerre medal commemorates the victims of the First World War. At the crossroads of the D1 and D106 towards Lusigny-sur-Barse, stands a memorial to members of the resistance who were arrested by the Germans on the 25 and 26 August 1944